Past Events 2006

Classical Societies and Cultures Revision Day – An Event for Schools

Saturday, 9 September, 2006 – 1.00 pm
University of Melbourne campus.

This Saturday afternoon event helps school students revise and prepare for the VCE Classical Societies and Cultures exam. Staff from the University of Melbourne will give revision lectures on Homer’s Iliad, Vergil’s Aeneid, Seneca’s Trojan Women, and Greek and Roman art. There will also be a session on how to construct an essay.

Latin Night – An Event for Schools

Thursday, 24 August, 2006 – 5.30 pm.
Elisabeth Murdoch Building Courtyard, University of Melbourne.

Latin Night is an evening for school students to revise and prepare for the VCE Latin exam. Pizza and soda will be served at 5.30 in the Elisabeth Murdoch Building Courtyard, with lectures from 6.15 onwards in Elisabeth Murdoch Theatre A. Staff from the University of Melbourne will give talks about poetic techniques and general themes in this year’s set text (Vergil’s Aeneid 2), as well as about the Latin unseen paper.

The Annual H. W. Allen Memorial Lecture

Tuesday, 19 September, 2006 – 8.00 pm.
Kaye Scott Room, Ormand College, University of Melbourne.

Shakespeare’s Iliad: Homeric themes in Troilus and Cressida

Mr John Penwill
Convenor of Arts, LaTrobe University (Bendigo)
President of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS).

The annual H. W. Allen Memorial lecture will be accompanied by the awarding of the annual Leeper prize for the most outstanding undergraduate student who completed B.A. honours in classics in Victoria in 2005.

The Classical Association of Victoria also participates in the vigorous public lecture program run by The School of Art History, Cinema, Classics & Archaeology.

The Pearl of Ionia: Excavations and Research at Miletos

Wednesday, 5 April, 2006, 6:30 pm
Dr Alan Greaves
University of Liverpool (UK)
Elisabeth Murdoch Theatre A, The University of Melbourne

In this illustrated lecture, Dr Alan Greaves will present his latest research into the history and archaeology of this most important and overlooked of Greek cities and examine the social and economic foundations of its reputation as a mighty trading state, prodigious coloniser and the birthplace of western philosophy. This lecture is part of the Public Lecture Series of the School of AHCCA (Art History, Cinema, Classics and Archaeology) at the University of Melbourne.

Saving Herculaneum

Thursday, April 6, 2006, 6:30 pm
Prof Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
University of Reading, U.K.; Director of the British School at Rome
Elisabeth Murdoch Theatre A, The University of Melbourne

Herculaneum, destroyed in the same eruption as Pompeii, is less well known but in many ways preserves a more vivid image of Roman life. A conservation crisis puts both sites in imminent danger of a second destruction. This lecture describes the attempts of the Herculaneum Conservation Project to rescue the site and some important new discoveries it has made. Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, director of the project, is Director of the British School at Rome, author of books and articles on a wide range of themes of Roman social and cultural history, including “Houses and Society in Pompeii and Herculaneum,” and broadcaster of many programmes on the Roman world.

This lecture is sponsored by the Fine Arts Network (FAN) in collaboration with the School of AHCCA, University of Melbourne.

The Invention of Money by the Greeks: How it Happened and the Difference it Made

Tuesday, 21 March, 2006 – 6.30 PM
Professor Richard Seaford
Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Exeter (U.K.)
Elisabeth Murdoch Theatre A, The University of Melbourne

Money is central to lives, but is a comparatively recent invention in the history of humankind. How was it invented and what differences did it make? The answers are to be found in the Greek city-states of the sixth century BC, the first monetised society in history.

This lecture is part of the Public Lecture Series of the School of AHCCA (Art History, Cinema, Classics and Archaeology) at the University of Melbourne.

Conference

19-23 September, 2006

Close Relations: The ‘Spaces’ of Greek and Roman Theatre

A conference held on the University of Melbourne campus The Classical Association of Victoria and the Melbourne Friends of the AAIA have given financial support to this joint initiative by the University of Melbourne and Monash University. ‘Close Relations’ is an international, multi-disciplinary conference linking theatre and performance studies, archaeology, classical studies and reception studies.

Teachers In-Service Day (for secondary school teachers of Classics)

Friday, 24 February, 2006 9.00 am – 3.00 pm
cost: $50

  • talks on VCE texts (including Aeneid II)
  • a theatrical presentation by Omniprop Productions (a student theatre group that performs ancient Greek and Roman drama)
  • a demonstration of a computer simulation of sites in Italy and Greece called ‘Proxima Veritati’
  • notes on travel to classical sites in Libya

Melbourne Girls Grammar, 82 Anderson Street, South Yarra

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