Culture and Ideology under the Seleucids: An Interdisciplinary Approach

29-31 March 2019

Macquarie University, Sydney

The conference seeks to bring together historians, archaeologists, epigraphists and other scholars interested in the cultural ideologies that shaped the character of Seleucid rulership from its foundation to its end. The renewed interest in Seleucid studies in the past two decades, anticipated by Andreas Mehl and his Seleukos Nikator und sein Reich (1986), has certainly restored its early obscure scholarly profile as a dynasty that spiraled into decline soon after the death of its founder (E.R. Bevan, 1902, The House of Seleucus, 1.76). More recently, the appreciation and sensitivity of the Seleucids to the cultural symbols and traditions of the regions they ruled has attracted significant scholarly attention (for example, see D. Ogden, The Legend of Seleucus, 2017; K. Erickson, “Seleucus I, Zeus and Alexander,” in Every Inch a King, 2013 and id. “Apollo-Nabû: the Babylonian Policy of Antiochus I,” in Seleucid Dissolution, 2011; N. Wright, Divine Kings and Sacred Spaces, 2012; P.A. Beaulieu, “Nabû and Apollo: the Two Faces of Seleucid Religious Policy,” in Orient und Okzident in hellenistischer Zeit, 2014; P.J. Kosmin, “Seeing Double in Seleucid Babylonia,” in Patterns of the Past, 2014).

Equally, Seleucid archaeology has made huge strides, not only in the Levant, Turkey and Central Asia, but also in Syria and Mesopotamia; as the 2018 SCS “New Directions in Seleucid Archaeology” panel showcased, “Numerous surveys and excavations that have been initiated in the last 5-10 years in Iraq and the Gulf are producing great quantities of material of Seleucid date.”

We now think it is time to enrich the scholarly debate on the Seleucids by inviting voices from all disciplines studying the Seleucid phenomenon to contribute to it. Confirmed speakers (in alphabetical order) include:

Paul-Alain Beaulieu (Toronto)
Andreas Mehl (Halle-Wittenberg)
Rachel Mairs (Reading)
Daniel Ogden (Exeter)
Stefan Pfeiffer (Halle-Wittenberg)

Our aim is to initiate an interdisciplinary network of scholars interested in the Hellenistic successors and their regimes so that this conference can be repeated every two years in universities across the world and pave new lines of communication and new research agendas across disciplines. The Seleucids were proud of their mixed cultural background and therefore, to be able to appreciate them we need to expand our lenses of studying them.

Individual abstracts or thematic panels are invited to submit their abstracts to Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au by July 29 2018.

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ASCS 40 (2019)

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will hold its 40th Annual Meeting and Conference at the University of New England in Armidale, NSW, Australia, ‪from 4-7 Feb 2019.  We welcome abstracts on all aspects of the classical world, its reception, and traditions.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is ‪Tuesday 31 July 2018.

The abstract coversheet, instructions for submitting abstracts, and guidelines for papers and panels can be found on the ASCS website.

The conference convenors are Drs Graeme Bourke, Bronwyn Hopwood and Clemens Koehn.  Please direct enquiries prior to ‪31st July to Bronwyn Hopwood (bhopwood@une.edu.au), or to all three convenors thereafter.

2019 will be an auspicious year. It marks the 40th Annual Conference of ASCS, the 50th Anniversary of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, and 60th Anniversary of the UNE Museum of Antiquities.  We are delighted, therefore, to announce four special events as part of ASCS 40 (2019):

The 40th ASCS Annual Conference Keynote Lecture will be delivered by the 2019 ASCS Keynote Speaker, Professor Theresa Morgan (Oriel College, Oxford).

The 21st A. D. Trendall Lecture of the Australian Academy of the Humanities will be delivered jointly by Dr Lea Beness and Associate Professor Thomas Hillard (Macquarie University).

The 23rd Maurice Kelly Lecture of the University of New England Museum of Antiquities (UNEMA), will be delivered by Dr Julie Anderson, Assistant Keeper (Curator), Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan (The British Museum).

UNEMA will also unveil the UNEMA 60th Anniversary Commemorative Artefact.

A conference website, including detailed information about the conference venue, transport, accommodation and registration will be available shortly and linked from the ASCS page.

Amphorae XII

Constructions and Transgressions

University of Auckland, 4-6 July 2018

We invite submission of abstracts for the 12th Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in Hellenic Or Roman Antiquities and Egyptology (AMPHORAE), to be held in Auckland from 4–6 July 2018. The conference is open to postgraduate students from Honours to PhD level, and aims to create a friendly, inclusive environment to present your research and interact with other postgraduates. Postgraduate students who are between degrees are also welcome.

The theme for 2018 is ‘Constructions and Transgressions’, and we hope to bring together speakers on a wide range of topics and subject areas. We invite papers on any ancient topic, including Egyptian, Greek and Roman history (up to and including late antiquity), the ancient Near East, archaeology, ancient literature and language, ancient art, and reception studies. We also welcome panel submissions.

Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length and will be followed by 5 minutes of discussion.

Thanks to the generous support of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies, we will be able to offer a number of student travel subsidies to assist with the cost of attending the conference. Preference will be given to postgraduates in Australasia who have joined ASCS. Please send a completed Travel Subsidy Application Form (available on the conference website) to abstracts@amphorae2018.co.nz by 1 June if you would like to be considered for a travel subsidy.

For more information, please see the conference website.

To submit an abstract, please email abstracts@amphorae2018.co.nz with a completed cover sheet (available on the website ) and abstract of 150-250 words by 5pm NZ time, 30 April 2018. Earlier submissions are welcome and will be addressed as they arrive.

Tacitus’ Wonders

Conference at Victoria University of Wellington, 27-29 August 2018.

First call for papers.

Readers have been attracted to the remarkable and wondrous, the admirable and the uncanny in Tacitus. But in order to appreciate what is mirum or novum, we also need to understand the apparently mundane material between the monstra. Tacitus famously derides the praises of new public buildings as a topic more worthy of the daily gazette than illustres annales (A. 13.31.1); his own criteria for selection, however, and his own judgments on what is worthy of note, have often differed in interesting ways from the preoccupations of his readers.

Abstracts (250 words) are invited on the topic of Tacitus’ wonders.

Submissions on comparative material are very much welcome.

Reflection is invited on the consequences of different methods of dividing or reconciling historical events and historiographical representation, e.g. Woodman (1993), O’Gorman (2001), Haynes (2003), and Sailor (2008). In preparing abstracts, it will be helpful to consider the challenge extended by Dench (in Feldherr, 2009), the ‘awkward question’ of whether the much admired Tacitean text ‘represents anything other than itself’. Papers treating the Classical tradition, reception and history of scholarship are welcome.

Please send abstracts to James McNamara at Victoria University of Wellington (james.mcnamara@vuw.ac.nz) by Friday 26 January 2018.

Prof. Arthur Pomeroy
Dr. James McNamara

Classics Programme
School of Art History, Classics and Religious Studies
Victoria University of Wellington
New Zealand

Travel Scholarship for Victorian postgraduates to attend AMPHORAE X conference at University of Tasmania

The Classical Association of Victoria is pleased to offer travel scholarships to Victorian postgraduates attending the 10th AMPHORAE (Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in Hellenic or Roman Antiquities and Egyptology) conference at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, 29 June – 1 July 2016. This scholarship will cover the airfare costs for postgraduate students enrolled at a tertiary institution in the state of Victoria, and who have been unable to apply for or receive travel money from their own university, and who have been unsuccessful in receiving travel funds from ASCS (Australasian Society for Classical Studies). The amount of the travel scholarship is flexible, but will only cover airfare, with preference for those who are confirmed to deliver papers at the conference.

Applicants should complete the application form and attach an airfare quote, and email to koc@unimelb.edu.au by 8 June, 2016.

Amphorae X: Old is New? Circling to the World’s End

University of Tasmania, Hobart, 29 June-1 July 2016

Conference Web Site

Amphorae provides an opportunity for postgraduate students throughout Australiasia to interact with others in the field of classical studies. Those eligible for the conference include all those studying at an Honours, Masters or PhD level, encompassing research into literature, history, archaeology, art or reception studies.

The theme for this year’s Amphorae conference is ‘Old is New? Circling to the World’s End’. The theme is inspired by our position on the map and what we believe to be the essence of Amphorae and Classical studies.

First call for papers is now open! Please send your completed registration form and abstract to amphoraex@gmail.com by 5pm EST 11 March.