Other Events of Interest

Plastics in Archaeology (PIA): Survey, Identification and Analysis of the Composition and Condition of Polymeric Materials in the Field to Assist in the Management of Malignant Plastics in Archaeological Collections

A paper by Sharon Wong, Grimwade Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 26 August in Old Arts 107 (William Macmahon Ball Theatre).

Plastics in Archaeology (PIA) aims to investigate what measures are required to manage malignant plastics in archaeological collections. PIA seeks to understand what plastics are in the archaeological record and the extent of deterioration of plastic storage materials containing archaeological artefacts. Surveying museum collections and conducting interviews/questionnaires should identify the variety of polymers and conservation methods applied. Instrumental techniques including but not limited to Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) should identify types of polymers and plasticisers. Accelerated ageing studies of plastic storage materials should determine which methods are most appropriate for the management of archaeological plastics.

Image: Comb, dark brown Bakelite, 1907 – ca. mid-20th c. (Royal Exhibition Building Western Forecourt site)

 

Anniversaries, Celebrations and Commemorations in the Ancient World and their Reception

20th annual UNISA Classics Colloquium

We are pleased to announce the first call for papers for the annual UNISA Classics Colloquium, to be held in Pretoria from 15 to 18 August 2019.

The conference aims to explore issues marking celebrations, commemorations and anniversaries of all kinds around the ancient world (up to the 7th century CE, but including its reception in later periods).  Topics enlarging on the literary, social and political significance of such events in the building of not only civic identities but also individual legacies, as well as the appropriation of these occasions in later contexts, will be welcomed.

Paper proposals (approximately 300 words) are invited for papers of 30 minutes debating current issues and problems on any aspect of the above theme.  Abstracts and titles should include your name and university affiliation, and should be submitted to either:

Deadline for abstracts: 30 April 2019

Details of the conference venue, accommodation and other important information will be made available on the conference web site, which we hope to have up and running soon.

We look forward to hearing from you, and please do not hesitate to contact us at the addresses provided above if you have any queries.

 

Homes & Homecomings

33rd Biennial Conference of the Classical Association of South Africa, Stellenbosch 7-10 November 2019.

The Classical Association of South Africa (CASA) invites proposals for papers for its 33rd Biennial Conference, to be hosted by the Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Stellenbosch.

We invite submissions that focus on the conference theme “Homes & Homecomings” as well as individual proposals on other aspects of the classical world and its reception. Panels are strongly encouraged and should consist of 3 to 8 related papers put together by the panel chair. We also welcome postgraduate students currently busy with Master’s or Doctoral programmes to submit papers for a “work-in-progress” parallel session.

Please submit a paper title, an abstract (approximately 300 words), and author affiliation to Annemarie de Villiers at amdev@sun.ac.za. The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2019.

Further information on conference fees and accommodation to follow in due course.

 

Late Antique Textualities

Society for Late Antiquity sponsored session for the Society for Classical Studies meeting January 2–5, 2020.  Organizer: Colin Whiting, American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting at cwhiting@ascsa.org. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

 

The Spatial Turn in Roman Studies

Auckland, January 22-24 2020

Durham, June 10-12 2020

Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis

https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-spatial-turn-roman-studies

We announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. This is the call for papers for the Auckland conference, 22-24 January 2020. A call for papers for the Durham conference will follow.

We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it.

The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space?

The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context. Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies: Auckland’. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline.

It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago.

Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

 

ASCS 41 (2020)

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will hold its 41st Annual Meeting and Conference at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, from 28-31 January 2020. We welcome abstracts on all aspects of the classical world, its reception, and traditions.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Wednesday 31st July 2019.

The abstract coversheet, instructions for submitting abstracts, and guidelines for papers and panels can be found on the ASCS website.  ​

The conference convenor is Dr Daniel Osland, with abundant support from his colleagues at Otago. Please direct enquiries related to ASCS 41 (2020) to Daniel Osland at ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz.

The 41st ASCS Annual Conference Keynote Lecture will be delivered by Cam Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Exchanging Ideas: Trade, Technology and Connectivity in Pre-Roman Italy

3-5 February 2020, University of Auckland, New Zealand

This conference will explore models for the transmission of objects, ideas, production techniques, artistic styles, and other technologies in pre-Roman Italy, from the early Iron Age through the fourth century BCE. Through the presentation of innovative and dynamic approaches to trade, exchange, and connectivity, this event will emphasize both the agency of individuals in that exchange as well as the complex network of communication visible in the archaeology and history of Italy during this period.

We therefore invite proposals for papers (30min, followed by 10min for questions and discussion) on various aspects of connectivity, trade, communication, and technology in Italy from c. 900 to c. 300 BCE.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to)…

–          Networks of exchange and communication
–          The spread and/or diffusion of technology and/or artistic style
–          Control and administration of trade, technology, and communication
–          Connections and relationships between craft sites and communities, industries and workshops, artisans and elites
–          Women, families, and production
–          Movement of artisans and traders, and the role of general mobility in trade and technology
–          Local markets and international networks

Proposals should include a title and an abstract of not more than 250 words. We welcome proposals from scholars working on these issues at all stages of their careers, including graduate students and early career scholars.

Proposals should be sent to exchangingideas2020@gmail.com by 1 June 2019.

Confirmed speakers include:

Hilary Becker (Binghamton)
Seth Bernard (Toronto)
John Hopkins (NYU)
Cristiano Iaia (Newcastle/La Sapienza)
Charlotte Potts (Oxford)
Christopher Smith (St Andrews)
Marleen Termeer (Amsterdam)
Nicola Terrenato (Michigan)
Gijs Tol (Melbourne)

There will be a small registration fee to help cover catering and other costs. If you would like to attend, but not offer a paper, please also note your interest via the conference email address (exchangingideas2020@gmail.com) by 1 June 2019 and you will be sent registration information once that is available.

The conference organizers would also like to highlight that the week before this event, the University of Otago in Dunedin, NZ, will be hosting the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) Conference (27-31 January 2020). Any participants interested in attending this event, particularly if coming from the northern hemisphere, may also wish to attend the other. For more information on the ASCS conference, please contact Dr. Dan Osland (dan.osland@otago.ac.nz).

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of the conference organizers: Jeremy Armstrong (js.armstrong@auckland.ac.nz), Sheira Cohen (sheiraco@umich.edu), and Aaron Rhodes-Schroder (aaron.rhodes-schroder@auckland.ac.nz).

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