Other Events of Interest

Grief and Consolation

IAS/UWA Classics and Ancient History/CHE Symposium, Institute of Advanced Studies, The University of Western Australia
15 September 2017

More info: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/grief-and-consolation
Submissions Deadline: 1 August, 2017
Submissions: Send to Lara O’Sullivan (lara.osullivan@uwa.edu.au)

Grief, particularly the grief associated with bereavement, has been a constant companion of humanity throughout the ages. But how are we best to deal with grief? Traditional rituals have had a part to play, but consolation for grief has also been sought through intellectual processes: through awareness and (self-) analysis of the emotional and cognitive responses to grief, and through the articulation of grief in language, music and the arts.

Held under the joint aegis of the Institute of Advanced Studies UWA, the Discipline of Classics and Ancient History at UWA, and the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of the Emotions, this interdisciplinary colloquium proposes a broad exploration of grief, and of the strategies employed in the consolation grief across time and culture. Papers (of c. 20 minutes’ duration) are invited to engage with this theme, whether literary, musical, philosophical, medical or other perspectives.

The special guest at the colloquium will be Professor Han Baltussen, the Walter Watson Hughes Professor Classics at the University of Adelaide. Professor Baltussen will be visiting UWA in September as an IAS Visiting Professor; while in Perth, he will be working on his current project, which traces the emergence of the conscious treatment of grief in ancient Greek oratory, philosophy and medicine.

 

Homer and the Epic Tradition IX

The 9th Homer Seminar, to be held at ANU, will take place from 4–5 December 2017. The seminar is intended to give Australasian scholars interested in the epic tradition the chance to test out ideas, methodologies and findings in a supportive environment, and is particularly (but not exclusively) open to postgraduates and early career researchers. Please submit your abstract to Fiona Sweet Formiatti (fiona.sweet-formiatti@anu.edu.au) by 30 September. Further information.

 

Last of the Naval Triumphs: Revisiting Some Key Actian Honours

A paper by Frederik Vervaet for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 22 May in the Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

On 2 September 31 BCE, Caesar Octavianus, or Imperator Caesar Divi filius, as he then wanted to be known, won a decisive naval victory over his rival Marcus Antonius and his ally Cleopatra at Actium in Greece.  While some scholars even argue that there was no such thing as a separate triumph for this victory, others consider it to be not very different from the curule triumphs that preceded and followed it on 13 and 15 Quintilis, namely those over a number of European tribes and Egypt successively.  More often than not, they also tend to downplay the significance of the so-called Actian triumph.  This paper endeavours to cast a very different light on Octavianus’s second curule triumph by virtue of a careful reappraisal of the extant literary, numismatic and epigraphic evidence.

 

Third Intermediate Period/Iron Age I-II Raphia and Egypt’s Response to the Changed Political Spectrum in the Levant: Early Results

A paper by Stuart Ibrahim for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 8 May in the Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

Archaeological analysis has established that, following the Bronze Age Collapse (around 1200–1177 BC), all of the great Bronze Age kingdoms and empires, except for Egypt, crumbled into dust.  Other cultures and peoples took this opportunity to seize these lands and form their own kingdoms.  In the meantime, Egypt had declined into a period of Chaos (the Third Intermediate Period), with separate dynasties ruling over Upper and Lower Egypt.  It was only in Dynasty 22, under the Libyan King, Shoshenq I, that Egypt was reunified and able to influence the Levantine region.

This presentation comprises the preliminary results for my PhD analysis on the site of Raphia/Tell Rafa and the surrounding region and will attempt to expand on what we know already.  While the primary analysis will be on Raphia itself, the focus of this paper is on the surrounding regions and the most likely occupants of Raphia (these being the Philistines, the Israelites, surviving Canaanites (?) or even the Edomites).  These results will then be used to address the question of whether Egypt reclaimed Rafa under Shoshenq I or not.

Australasian Society for Classical Studies 2018

The 39th conference of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies will be held at the University of Queensland from 30 January to 2 February 2018.  Full details and the call for papers are available on the conference web site.

Submission of abstracts closes 28 July 2017.

Jodocus Badius and the Lyon Terence: The Earliest Illustrated incunabulum of the Six Comedies

A paper by Andrew Turner for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 1 May in the North Theatre, Old Arts.

The 1490s saw the first early printed editions (incunabula) of Terence’s plays incorporating an illustrative cycle found in manuscripts which had its origins in late antiquity; the earliest and most complete of these was published in Lyon, where it was edited by the Flemish classical scholar Jodocus Badius Ascensius.  Although the pictures appear to be a late addition to another edition and commentary on Terence, written by Guy Jouenneaux, behind them lies a large amount of careful scholarship by Badius.  Only two years earlier he published a major edition of the ancient commentary by Donatus on Terence, rediscovered in the 1440s, and had studied the classics extensively in Renaissance Ferrara at the precise time that the first dramatic revivals of Roman comedy were taking place on stage there.  This paper looks in more detail at the relationship of text, image and performance in one of the key works for the reception of Terence in the later Renaissance.

 

The Dilemma of Vibia Sabina’s Roman Coins

A paper by Trudie Fraser for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 24 April in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

The coins of Vibia Sabina, wife of the emperor Hadrian, are beautiful and their number suggests that she was honoured with more coins than any previous emperor’s wife. The chronology of these coins, however,  has puzzled many scholars for nearly a century with no satisfactory conclusion having yet been reached.  The variety of the iconography, both the obverse images of Sabina and the selection of reverse images, several different legends and the use of most coin denominations, all contribute to an enormous chronological dilemma.  This paper discusses these problems with many illustrations of Sabina’s coins. It attempts to provide reasons for the different combinations of image and legend and to suggest a possible chronology for Sabina’s coins, which in turn could shed some light on Sabina’s relationship with her husband.

The Once and Future Kings: Roman Emperors and Western Political Culture from Antiquity to the Present

We are delighted to announce that registration is now open for the international conference, ‘The Once and Future Kings: Roman Emperors and Western Political Culture from Antiquity to the Present’, which is being held from July 5-7, 2017, at the University of Queensland St Lucia Campus in Brisbane.

We are pleased to host Prof. Rhiannon Ash (Oxford), Prof. David Scourfield (Maynooth) and Dr Penelope Goodman (Leeds) as our keynote speakers. The conference will open on the evening of Wednesday, July 5, with a public lecture by Prof. Ash on ‘Emperors in Space’, followed by a full two-day programme featuring speakers from the UK, US, Australia and New Zealand. The conference dinner will be held on Thursday, July 6, at Saint Lucy Caffé e Cucina on the St Lucia Campus.

Delegates coming from outside Brisbane may be interested to know that the exhibition ‘Gladiators: Heroes of the Colosseum’ will be on at the Queensland Museum in July. We have secured a limited number of tickets at a discount rate for an excursion on Saturday, July 8.

The conference web site, including a full programme, is available here: https://hapi.uq.edu.au/once-and-future-kings-conference

Download the poster.

Registration closes on May 31, 2017.

We are grateful to the R. D. Milns Perpetual Endowment Fund and to the Australasian Society for Classical Studies for their financial support of this conference.

Best wishes,
Caillan Davenport and Shushma Malik
c.davenport@uq.edu.au
s.malik@uq.edu.au

Yo Ho, Yo Ho, A Pirate’s Life for Me: The Maritime Culture of the Sea People

A paper by Professor Louise Hitchcock, University of Melbourne, for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 10 April in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

An anthropological approach to culture extrapolates social structures, traditions and general organizing principles of that culture from the careful observation of patterns of behavior as described in case studies.  In the absence of a living culture to record, archaeologists extrapolate this information from behavior reconstructed from spatially determined patterns in the deposition of material remains and from patterns found in the general organizing principles of historically documented cultures, using arguments based on analogy.  This talk builds on my previous research with Aren Maeir on the “Sea Peoples” as a piratical culture in order to investigate and to apply an anthropological approach to understanding the cultural identities of the various tribal groups involved in maritime activities at the end of the Bronze Age who are popularly known as the “Sea People” and place this within the broader context of the current discussions on the transition between the Late Bronze and Iron Age in the Mediterranean.

 

New Thoughts on the End of the Mycenaean Palaces

A paper by Professor Philipp Stockhammer, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 3 April in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

For a long time, the 13th century in the Aegean has been considered as a peaceful period marked by rather stable, local communities and the large-scale exchange of commodities most emblematically materialised by the Mycenaean palaces of the Argolid.  In contrast to that, the 12th century seemed to be characterised not only by the end of the palaces and all connected societal institutions but also by human mobility together with a rather neglectable scale of the exchange of commodities.  The year 1200 BC was considered as the peak of the crisis which has been taken as an explanation for the assumed groundbreaking shifts between the two centuries.

In my paper, I want to go beyond simplifying narratives and take a more differentiated view on what transformations took place at the end of the 13th century or already during its course.  I want to show that major changes already seem to have taken place in the second half of the 13th century and continued into the 12th century and thereby relativise the year 1200 BC as a hallmark of the developments.  I will demonstrate the shifts of the Mediterranean network of mobility of humans and objects during the 13th century and in the early 12th century with a strong focus on the archaeological evidence from Tiryns. This will lead to a revaluation of the historical developments in the 13th century.

In the final part of my paper, I will then present our newly founded Max Planck Harvard Research Center for the Archaeoscience of the Ancient Mediterranean (MHAAM) and present a vision for future research which will help us to shed a completely new light on the issues discussed in the first part of my lecture.

 

Cultural Cleansing and Iconoclasm under the ‘Islamic State’: Human/Heritage Attacks on Yezidis and Christians

A paper by Antonio Gonzalez, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 20 March in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

When the ‘Islamic State’ (IS) seized large swathes of territory across Iraq and Syria and declared their new caliphate, they unleashed a cataclysmic wave of both devastating human suffering and unprecedented heritage destruction.  In terms of the human suffering, the IS has executed many who questioned their nefarious ideology or committed petty crimes.  At the same time, the rapid expansion of the IS has also proved fatal for many of the world’s most sensitive and important cultural heritage sites.  Targeted sites range from ancient Mesopotamian city-states through to Greek, Roman and Byzantine sites, as well as museums, art galleries and libraries. However, little attention has been paid to the intersection between the human suffering and the heritage destruction undertaken by the Islamic State (IS).  Here, human/heritage destruction are intertwined: the suffering inflicted on people is projected onto their sites of ritual and worship; just as the destruction of these sites are deliberately orchestrated to inflict symbolic suffering on specific communities and to shatter the ethnic and religious diversity of the region.  This talk will explore and document the human/heritage ‘cultural cleansing’ undertaken by the IS against two fragile minorities: the Yezidi and Christian populations of northern Iraq and Syria.

 

The Pope’s Shoes: Cultural Glosses by Guy Jouenneaux in Badius’ 1493 Edition of Terence’s Comedies

A paper by K. O. Chong-Gossard, University of Melbourne for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 13 March in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

The invention of the printing press with movable type in the mid-15th century revolutionized the study of the classics, and it is no surprise that one of the most popular printed authors was Terence, whose six Latin comedies had been indispensable in the education of schoolboys for centuries. Terence’s comedies contain many references to ancient customs and to figures from classical mythology, some quite direct, others oblique. For late-15th century readers unfamiliar with all aspects of antiquity, the significance of an invocation to Juno Lucina or the mention of a psaltria in a character’s speech could be lost. This paper examines how the commentary of Guy Jouenneaux (a.k.a. Guido Juvenalis), which was printed in Badius’ 1493 edition of Terence, explains the background of ancient cultural references in the plays. Examples in the Eunuchus alone include military terms like centurio and cornu, the etymology of peniculon (a long sponge), and the myth of Hercules and OmphaleMost notably, Jouenneaux describes Omphale’s sandals as similar to the pope’s shoes worn at the celebration of mass, which is itself a reminder to us that late 15th Europeans no longer wore sandals. By examining such cultural glosses, and in particular his erudite quoting of ancient writers (Cicero, Ovid, Sallust, Varro, and Festus being frequent), we can understand more precisely what Jouenneaux means in his first epistle (printed in Badius’ edition) when he proclaims his intention to explain every small detail (minima quaeque) of the Latin for students whose desire for learning (discendi cupiditatem) is hampered for lack of a teacher or lack of money.

 

AMPHORAE XI

University of Sydney, 12-14 July 2017

Amphorae is a forum for postgraduate students in Classical Studies from throughout Australasia to interact with one another. Students eligible to participate include all those studying at Honours, Masters, and Ph.D. level. Papers may broadly cover topics inclusive of literature, history, archaeology, art, or reception studies.

The theme of this year’s Amphorae conference is ‘Immortal Words: Classical Antiquity Then and Now’. The theme is inspired by Mary Barnard’s translation of a fragment of the Greek lyric poet, Sappho, and celebrates the enduring relevance of the ancient world and Classical Studies.

The call for papers is now open.

If you wish to submit an abstract, simply send an e-mail to abstracts@ascs.org.au by 5pm EST on 31 March with your completed abstract form. Please note that this is a dedicated e-mail for abstracts, and submissions sent to the other conference email address will NOT be accepted.

The link to the abstract form is here: https://amphoraesydney.com/submit-an-abstract/

Other things to note:

1. Your presentation should be no longer than 20 minutes in order to allow for 10 minutes of question time following. Papers running overtime throw off the entire conference schedule, so please keep this in mind as you prepare.

2. If you are currently studying at Honours level, there are a few things to consider before submitting an abstract. Presenting a paper at Amphorae is a considerable time commitment, so you are well-advised to confer with your supervisor before submitting an abstract. If you wish to present your research, but are unable to manage a full 20-minute presentation, you might consider presenting a poster instead.

3. If you wish to present a poster rather than a paper, there are a few things to consider. Posters must be A0 in size and will be displayed in the foyer of the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (in which much of the conference will take place). Although you are not required to give a formal presentation, please ensure that you are regularly available to speak about your research in an informal setting. You should also clearly display your contact details on the poster so that attendees who were unable to speak to you about your research during the conference can contact you at a later date.

4. Access to computers, projectors, and internet will be provided. If you have a PowerPoint presentation accompanying your paper, upload it to a USB drive and bring it along. Alternatively, we are able to connect your personal computer directly with a VGA Cable (Mac adapter also available).

5. Access to a dedicated Classics library in the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia will be available. Those wishing to use this facility during the conference must send an e-mail to amphorae@ascs.org.au with a completed Readers Form attached.

More information can be found on the conference web site: http://www.amphoraesydney.com/.

 

The Evolution of Roman Armour During the Dacian Wars AD101-107

A paper by Michael Schmitz, University of Melbourne for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 6 March in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

The Roman military are renowned for their ability to adapt to the enemies they faced. This presentation will focus on the Roman adaptation of defensive equipment to mitigate the threat posed by the Dacians during Trajan’s wars against the Dacian king Decebalus between AD 101 and 106.

 

Ancient World Seminar – Semester 1

The programme for the Ancient World Seminar for semester 1 2017 at the University of Melbourne is now available.

The Ancient World Seminar is held at 1:00-2:00, usually on Monday during semester for presentations and discussions of papers from students and academic staff on all aspects of the ancient world.

Convenor

Hyun Jin Kim
kim.h@unimelb.edu.au

Venue

Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts, unless otherwise advised.

Download the programme or visit the web page.

 

Professional Development Course: Ancient History Teachers

Thursdays 9 March-6 April 2017, 6:00-8:15

This professional development course for ancient history teachers closely relates to VCE Units 1 to 4 of the Ancient History Study Design. In the first session John Whitehouse from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education will give a pedagogical overview of teaching ancient history. Each week eminent scholars from the Faculty of Arts will present key areas of study including Ancient Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient China, Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, exploring and developing historical skills, historical thinking and highlight a selection of appropriate primary source materials and historical interpretations.

Before the commencement of the program there will be an online forum (Learning Management System) to enable registered participants to access sample scholarly articles and support material. These resources, plus the lecture, will form the basis for discussions.

Professional Certificates of participation will be offered upon completion of the course and VIT applicable.

Individual session: $60
Series pass: $250

Full details, flyer and registration.