Other Events of Interest

New Thoughts on the End of the Mycenaean Palaces

A paper by Professor Philipp Stockhammer, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 3 April in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

For a long time, the 13th century in the Aegean has been considered as a peaceful period marked by rather stable, local communities and the large-scale exchange of commodities most emblematically materialised by the Mycenaean palaces of the Argolid.  In contrast to that, the 12th century seemed to be characterised not only by the end of the palaces and all connected societal institutions but also by human mobility together with a rather neglectable scale of the exchange of commodities.  The year 1200 BC was considered as the peak of the crisis which has been taken as an explanation for the assumed groundbreaking shifts between the two centuries.

In my paper, I want to go beyond simplifying narratives and take a more differentiated view on what transformations took place at the end of the 13th century or already during its course.  I want to show that major changes already seem to have taken place in the second half of the 13th century and continued into the 12th century and thereby relativise the year 1200 BC as a hallmark of the developments.  I will demonstrate the shifts of the Mediterranean network of mobility of humans and objects during the 13th century and in the early 12th century with a strong focus on the archaeological evidence from Tiryns. This will lead to a revaluation of the historical developments in the 13th century.

In the final part of my paper, I will then present our newly founded Max Planck Harvard Research Center for the Archaeoscience of the Ancient Mediterranean (MHAAM) and present a vision for future research which will help us to shed a completely new light on the issues discussed in the first part of my lecture.

 

Cultural Cleansing and Iconoclasm under the ‘Islamic State’: Human/Heritage Attacks on Yezidis and Christians

A paper by Antonio Gonzalez, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 20 March in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

When the ‘Islamic State’ (IS) seized large swathes of territory across Iraq and Syria and declared their new caliphate, they unleashed a cataclysmic wave of both devastating human suffering and unprecedented heritage destruction.  In terms of the human suffering, the IS has executed many who questioned their nefarious ideology or committed petty crimes.  At the same time, the rapid expansion of the IS has also proved fatal for many of the world’s most sensitive and important cultural heritage sites.  Targeted sites range from ancient Mesopotamian city-states through to Greek, Roman and Byzantine sites, as well as museums, art galleries and libraries. However, little attention has been paid to the intersection between the human suffering and the heritage destruction undertaken by the Islamic State (IS).  Here, human/heritage destruction are intertwined: the suffering inflicted on people is projected onto their sites of ritual and worship; just as the destruction of these sites are deliberately orchestrated to inflict symbolic suffering on specific communities and to shatter the ethnic and religious diversity of the region.  This talk will explore and document the human/heritage ‘cultural cleansing’ undertaken by the IS against two fragile minorities: the Yezidi and Christian populations of northern Iraq and Syria.

 

The Pope’s Shoes: Cultural Glosses by Guy Jouenneaux in Badius’ 1493 Edition of Terence’s Comedies

A paper by K. O. Chong-Gossard, University of Melbourne for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 13 March in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

The invention of the printing press with movable type in the mid-15th century revolutionized the study of the classics, and it is no surprise that one of the most popular printed authors was Terence, whose six Latin comedies had been indispensable in the education of schoolboys for centuries. Terence’s comedies contain many references to ancient customs and to figures from classical mythology, some quite direct, others oblique. For late-15th century readers unfamiliar with all aspects of antiquity, the significance of an invocation to Juno Lucina or the mention of a psaltria in a character’s speech could be lost. This paper examines how the commentary of Guy Jouenneaux (a.k.a. Guido Juvenalis), which was printed in Badius’ 1493 edition of Terence, explains the background of ancient cultural references in the plays. Examples in the Eunuchus alone include military terms like centurio and cornu, the etymology of peniculon (a long sponge), and the myth of Hercules and OmphaleMost notably, Jouenneaux describes Omphale’s sandals as similar to the pope’s shoes worn at the celebration of mass, which is itself a reminder to us that late 15th Europeans no longer wore sandals. By examining such cultural glosses, and in particular his erudite quoting of ancient writers (Cicero, Ovid, Sallust, Varro, and Festus being frequent), we can understand more precisely what Jouenneaux means in his first epistle (printed in Badius’ edition) when he proclaims his intention to explain every small detail (minima quaeque) of the Latin for students whose desire for learning (discendi cupiditatem) is hampered for lack of a teacher or lack of money.

 

AMPHORAE XI

University of Sydney, 12-14 July 2017

Amphorae is a forum for postgraduate students in Classical Studies from throughout Australasia to interact with one another. Students eligible to participate include all those studying at Honours, Masters, and Ph.D. level. Papers may broadly cover topics inclusive of literature, history, archaeology, art, or reception studies.

The theme of this year’s Amphorae conference is ‘Immortal Words: Classical Antiquity Then and Now’. The theme is inspired by Mary Barnard’s translation of a fragment of the Greek lyric poet, Sappho, and celebrates the enduring relevance of the ancient world and Classical Studies.

The call for papers is now open.

If you wish to submit an abstract, simply send an e-mail to abstracts@ascs.org.au by 5pm EST on 31 March with your completed abstract form. Please note that this is a dedicated e-mail for abstracts, and submissions sent to the other conference email address will NOT be accepted.

The link to the abstract form is here: https://amphoraesydney.com/submit-an-abstract/

Other things to note:

1. Your presentation should be no longer than 20 minutes in order to allow for 10 minutes of question time following. Papers running overtime throw off the entire conference schedule, so please keep this in mind as you prepare.

2. If you are currently studying at Honours level, there are a few things to consider before submitting an abstract. Presenting a paper at Amphorae is a considerable time commitment, so you are well-advised to confer with your supervisor before submitting an abstract. If you wish to present your research, but are unable to manage a full 20-minute presentation, you might consider presenting a poster instead.

3. If you wish to present a poster rather than a paper, there are a few things to consider. Posters must be A0 in size and will be displayed in the foyer of the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (in which much of the conference will take place). Although you are not required to give a formal presentation, please ensure that you are regularly available to speak about your research in an informal setting. You should also clearly display your contact details on the poster so that attendees who were unable to speak to you about your research during the conference can contact you at a later date.

4. Access to computers, projectors, and internet will be provided. If you have a PowerPoint presentation accompanying your paper, upload it to a USB drive and bring it along. Alternatively, we are able to connect your personal computer directly with a VGA Cable (Mac adapter also available).

5. Access to a dedicated Classics library in the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia will be available. Those wishing to use this facility during the conference must send an e-mail to amphorae@ascs.org.au with a completed Readers Form attached.

More information can be found on the conference web site: http://www.amphoraesydney.com/.

 

The Evolution of Roman Armour During the Dacian Wars AD101-107

A paper by Michael Schmitz, University of Melbourne for the Ancient World Seminar at 1:00 on Monday 6 March in the Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts.

The Roman military are renowned for their ability to adapt to the enemies they faced. This presentation will focus on the Roman adaptation of defensive equipment to mitigate the threat posed by the Dacians during Trajan’s wars against the Dacian king Decebalus between AD 101 and 106.

 

Ancient World Seminar – Semester 1

The programme for the Ancient World Seminar for semester 1 2017 at the University of Melbourne is now available.

The Ancient World Seminar is held at 1:00-2:00, usually on Monday during semester for presentations and discussions of papers from students and academic staff on all aspects of the ancient world.

Convenor

Hyun Jin Kim
kim.h@unimelb.edu.au

Venue

Mcmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts, unless otherwise advised.

Download the programme or visit the web page.

 

Professional Development Course: Ancient History Teachers

Thursdays 9 March-6 April 2017, 6:00-8:15

This professional development course for ancient history teachers closely relates to VCE Units 1 to 4 of the Ancient History Study Design. In the first session John Whitehouse from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education will give a pedagogical overview of teaching ancient history. Each week eminent scholars from the Faculty of Arts will present key areas of study including Ancient Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient China, Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, exploring and developing historical skills, historical thinking and highlight a selection of appropriate primary source materials and historical interpretations.

Before the commencement of the program there will be an online forum (Learning Management System) to enable registered participants to access sample scholarly articles and support material. These resources, plus the lecture, will form the basis for discussions.

Professional Certificates of participation will be offered upon completion of the course and VIT applicable.

Individual session: $60
Series pass: $250

Full details, flyer and registration.