Other Events of Interest

The Spatial Turn in Roman Studies

Auckland, January 22-24 2020

Durham, June 10-12 2020

Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis

https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-spatial-turn-roman-studies

We announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. This is the call for papers for the Auckland conference, 22-24 January 2020. A call for papers for the Durham conference will follow.

We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it.

The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space?

The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context. Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies: Auckland’. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline.

It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago.

Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

 

ASCS 41 (2020)

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will hold its 41st Annual Meeting and Conference at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, from 28-31 January 2020. We welcome abstracts on all aspects of the classical world, its reception, and traditions.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Wednesday 31st July 2019.

The abstract coversheet, instructions for submitting abstracts, and guidelines for papers and panels can be found on the ASCS website.  ​

The conference convenor is Dr Daniel Osland, with abundant support from his colleagues at Otago. Please direct enquiries related to ASCS 41 (2020) to Daniel Osland at ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz.

The 41st ASCS Annual Conference Keynote Lecture will be delivered by Cam Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Exchanging Ideas: Trade, Technology and Connectivity in Pre-Roman Italy

3-5 February 2020, University of Auckland, New Zealand

This conference will explore models for the transmission of objects, ideas, production techniques, artistic styles, and other technologies in pre-Roman Italy, from the early Iron Age through the fourth century BCE. Through the presentation of innovative and dynamic approaches to trade, exchange, and connectivity, this event will emphasize both the agency of individuals in that exchange as well as the complex network of communication visible in the archaeology and history of Italy during this period.

We therefore invite proposals for papers (30min, followed by 10min for questions and discussion) on various aspects of connectivity, trade, communication, and technology in Italy from c. 900 to c. 300 BCE.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to)…

–          Networks of exchange and communication
–          The spread and/or diffusion of technology and/or artistic style
–          Control and administration of trade, technology, and communication
–          Connections and relationships between craft sites and communities, industries and workshops, artisans and elites
–          Women, families, and production
–          Movement of artisans and traders, and the role of general mobility in trade and technology
–          Local markets and international networks

Proposals should include a title and an abstract of not more than 250 words. We welcome proposals from scholars working on these issues at all stages of their careers, including graduate students and early career scholars.

Proposals should be sent to exchangingideas2020@gmail.com by 1 June 2019.

Confirmed speakers include:

Hilary Becker (Binghamton)
Seth Bernard (Toronto)
John Hopkins (NYU)
Cristiano Iaia (Newcastle/La Sapienza)
Charlotte Potts (Oxford)
Christopher Smith (St Andrews)
Marleen Termeer (Amsterdam)
Nicola Terrenato (Michigan)
Gijs Tol (Melbourne)

There will be a small registration fee to help cover catering and other costs. If you would like to attend, but not offer a paper, please also note your interest via the conference email address (exchangingideas2020@gmail.com) by 1 June 2019 and you will be sent registration information once that is available.

The conference organizers would also like to highlight that the week before this event, the University of Otago in Dunedin, NZ, will be hosting the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) Conference (27-31 January 2020). Any participants interested in attending this event, particularly if coming from the northern hemisphere, may also wish to attend the other. For more information on the ASCS conference, please contact Dr. Dan Osland (dan.osland@otago.ac.nz).

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of the conference organizers: Jeremy Armstrong (js.armstrong@auckland.ac.nz), Sheira Cohen (sheiraco@umich.edu), and Aaron Rhodes-Schroder (aaron.rhodes-schroder@auckland.ac.nz).

 

The Reception of Plato in Later Antiquity and the Middle Ages

We are delighted to announce a 2-day conference, organized by the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in collaboration with the Australian Research Council and Macquarie University, Australia

The conference will take place at the University of Athens, 8-9 June 2020.

We have collaborated with the ISNS conference organisers so to facilitate the participation of local and international delegates to both events, but please note that the two events are run independently. News about our conference can be found on https://evanagno.wixsite.com/platoreception

Our Approach:

Taking start from our common interest in the Platonic tradition and its reception in later periods, our collaboration has to date yielded one edited volume (The Neoplatonists and their Heirs, Brill, 2020, ed. Ken Parry and E. Anagnostou-Laoutides), while a second one is anticipated to host select papers from the conference. We now wish to expand our network of co-thinkers and thus, we welcome papers on any aspect of Platonic reception, both in the Byzantine East and the Latin West, in philosophical, literary and/or theological texts. Confirmed Speakers include (in alphabetical order):

-Prof Dirk Baltzly (University of Tasmania)

-Prof Kevin Corrigan (Emory University)

-Prof Lloyd Gerson (Toronto University)

-Prof Ilaria Ramelli (Durham University/ “Angelicum” University/ Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan)

Please send abstracts of circa 300 words to the conference organisers by 15 December 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by 15th January 2020.

Our emails are: Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au; G.Steiris@ppp.uoa.gr; garabatz@ppp.uoa.gr

We look forward to receiving your contributions,

Sincerely,

Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (MQ) – George Steiris (UoA)– George Arabatzis (UoA)

 

Writing Ancient and Medieval Same-Sex Desire: Goals, Methods, Challenges

This call for papers is for a conference to take place June 30-July 2, 2020 at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the topic of writing about same-sex desire in ancient and medieval societies. See https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges for more.

Derek Krueger (UNC Greensboro), Mark Masterson (Victoria University of Wellington), Nancy Rabinowitz (Hamilton College), and Shaun Tougher (Cardiff University) will be providing  plenary addresses.

For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

  • essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
  • Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
  • (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
  • perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past’s alterity;
  • positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don’t exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours.

We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic.

Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson (writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com) by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also.

In your proposal include:

  • the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
  • the general theoretical basis of the work

This conference is underwritten by the Marsden Fund/Te Pūtea Rangahau A Marsden of the Royal Society/Te Apārangi of New Zealand.

Dr. Mark Masterson
Senior Lecturer of Classics
Marsden Fund Researcher (2018-2020) on desire between Byzantine men
Author of Man to Man (Ohio 2014)
Classics Programme
Victoria University of Wellington
600 Kelburn Parade
Wellington, New Zealand 6140
Phone: 64 4 463 6909
Email: Mark.Masterson@vuw.ac.nz
Location: OLD KIRK 514
Web: http://en.gravatar.com/kiwimark

 

Images of Early Rome

The thirty-fourth meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at Boston University from 10 to 12 July 2020. The theme for the 2020 conference will be “Images of  Early Rome.”

Papers are invited to explore different depictions of the figures of early Rome in Latin literature; Aeneas, Ilia, Romulus and Remus, the Sabine Women, Lucretia, etc. How do the iterations of these figures reflect (or problematize) political and literary attitudes in Rome? And what does the continued presence of these early figures in the works of successive literary generations tell us about the enduring nature of these Roman “myths”? We also invite papers on the reception of early Rome in any medium, from Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece (1594), to Ursula K. Le Guin’s Lavinia (2008), to Matteo Rovere’s Il Primo Re (2019).

Papers should be 30 minutes in length (with fifteen minutes of discussion time). The Pacific Rim Seminar does not run parallel sessions; participants can attend any or all papers. Abstract proposals of 200-300 words, and queries about the conference, should be sent to the organizer, Hannah Čulík-Baird, at culik@bu.edu. Submissions from graduate students and early-career researchers are welcome. Please have abstracts submitted by 15th January 2020 (earlier submissions welcome).

Further details about accommodations, dining, and tourism in Boston during the Pac Rim will be posted on this blog after the finalization of the schedule.